storyteller

Books

Some selected accolades.

 
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The Protectors

Little A Books, 2016
Kindle in Motion

A coal town in the foothills of Appalachia is a good place in which to start over. After all, it's only the boys who are dying.
A novella with original illustrations and live-action film clips.

 
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Supervision

HarperVoyagerUK (HarperCollins), 2015
Digital Submissions Contest Winner

A lonely New York teen is thrown into small-town life when she's sent to live with her grandmother; she finds solace in the friends she makes, but something is wrong: her friends are dead, and she might be too.

An eerie coming-of-age tale, about a girl who finds herself a family of ghosts.
— Katherine Harbour
 
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Wait

University of Wisconsin Press, 2011
Brittingham Prize Winner, selected by Cornelius Eady

In a small town under a spell, a child bride prays for the sheriff's gun. Iron under a bed stops a nightmare. The carousel artist can carve only birds. Part fairy tale, part gothic ballad: on the outskirts of town, someone new is waiting.

...riveting, almost gothic ferocity. The universe of Wait crackles, burns brightly, while also leading into a darkness of its own. The collection is impressive not just for its immense formal grace, but also for the adamant, forceful desire—its ‘call of skin’—that singes through every poem.”
— MAGGIE NELSON
 
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Ohio Violence

University of North Texas Press, 2009
Vassar Miller Prize Winner, selected by Eric Panky

In the fields, in the woods, in the dark waters of Ohio, something is happening. Girls disappear, turn on each other. Men watch from the rear view as the narrator hedges, changes her mind, won't tell, then shows all in this break-out collection of bittersweet and cataclysmic lyrics.

a gut punch of a debut.
— ANDER MONSON
Your heart is bound to be forever bruised.
— AIMEE NEZHUKUMATATHIL
 
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Lot of My Sister

Kent State University Press, 2001
Wick Student Prize Winner
Maggie Anderson, Series Editor

Confessional and meditative sequences… shadowed by the tradition of dramatic narrative; they propose types of redemptive performance…. a lost, outcast belated family is assembled by invocation.
— ROBERT HILL LONG
This is intricate, strong, and very tough work.
— PAUL ZIMMER